Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Properties of Mechano-Transduction via Simulated Microgravity and its Effects on Intracellular Trafficking of VEGFR’s

Andrew Puca, _ Giuseppe Russo, Antonio Giordano

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Abstract

Andrew Puca1, Giuseppe Russo1 and Antonio Giordano1,2

1 Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, College of Science and Technology, Temple University Philadelphia, PA USA

2 Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Siena, Nuovo Policlinico “Le Scotte”, Siena, Italy

Received: March 29, 2012, Accepted: May 5, 2012, Published: May 6, 2012,

Keywords: Thrombopoietin, VEGFR’s, CD34+, CD45

Correspondence:

Antonio Giordano, email:

Abstract

This study emphasizes the dynamical properties of mechanical loading via simulated microgravity, its effect on acute myeloid leukemia proliferation and hematopoietic stem cell (HSPC) growth and its implications in the area of tissue regeneration. Data presented illustrates that mechanical transduction changes the expression of humoral factors by facilitating paracrine/autocrine signalling, therefore modulating intracellular trafficking of tyrosine kinase receptors. Understanding mechano-transduction in the context of cell and tissue morphogenesis is the major focus of this study. The effects of external physiological stresses, such as blood flow, on several cellular subtypes seem to produce very intricate cellular responses. It is well accepted that mechanical loading plays an intrinsic and extrinsic influence on cell survival. This study shows how microgravity effects hematopoietic stem cells, and human leukemic cell proliferation and expression of its receptors that control cell survival, such as the tyrosine kinase vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1, receptor-2 and receptor-3.

Author Information

Andrew Puca
Primary Contact  _

Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, College of Science and Technology, Temple University Philadelphia, PA USA

Giuseppe Russo
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, College of Science and Technology, Temple University Philadelphia, PA USA;

Antonio Giordano
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, College of Science and Technology, Temple University Philadelphia, PA USA; Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Siena, Nuovo Policlinico “Le Scotte”, Siena, Italy


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